Blog Redux: Can Rare Floods Bring the Colorado River Delta Back?

In a couple of weeks, your trusty blogger will be traipsing across the desert Southwest, helping lead a group of journalists on a “learning expedition” down the Colorado River. This Wednesday, Science on Tap-Minocqua will host a conversation about Aldo Read More …

Learning from Our Mistakes: A Silver-Lining Spin on the Science of Invasive Species

by Jake Walsh There is a fortunate silver-lining to those of us prone to making mistakes – they can be a powerful teaching tool. At a minimum, our mistakes teach us things we shouldn’t be doing. In the best cases, Read More …

Science on Tap, Dec. 6th: Swarming Insects & Artificial Intelligence

In a couple of weeks, after you’ve recovered from your Thanksgiving food coma but before the big Christmas binge begins, you should come on out and join us for a big ol’ slice of science. On Wednesday, December 6th, we’ve Read More …

A Cocktail of Contaminants: Moving Away From Single Chemical Science

Efforts to relax environmental regulations and weaken wetland protections have been in the news a lot in Wisconsin recently, which made the post we just read from The Fisheries Blog even more relevant. What’s in our water? The answer is Read More …

Do “Piggyback Rides” Play an Important Role in Invasive Species Dispersal?

by Neil Coughlan and Andy Stevens Late one night, Andy Stevens, then a Center for Limnology graduate student, pulled a minnow trap out of the water off of the Hasler Lab pier in Lake Mendota. In the glare of his Read More …

Lake Is a Rainbow: Weird, Warm Fall Makes “Three-Layer Lake Cake”

by Luke Loken Autumn is typically associated with fall colors, pumpkin spice lattes, and cool temperatures. However this year, much of the Midwest has been stuck in summer-like conditions. And these record temperatures come with unexpected consequences. Usually, as the Read More …

Despite Changes in Climate, Land Use and Management Practices, Lakes Stay Surprisingly Static

Over the last few decades, change has defined our environment in the United States. Agriculture intensified. Urban areas sprawled. The climate warmed. Intense rainstorms became more common. But, says a new study, while those kinds of changes usually result in Read More …

Trout Lake Research Rewind: Fyke Nets & Native Mussels

by Riley Steinbrenner Week Seven This summer, CFL graduate students Martin Perales and Holly Embke are busy catching fish on their two study lakes–Sandy Beach Lake and McDermott Lake in Iron County–using a lot of different methods. One of these Read More …

Investment in Science Crucial to Tackling “Grand Challenges” for the Great Lakes

by Cheryl Reitan & Adam Hinterthuer Duluth, MN – In September of 2014, fifty-eight scientists gathered to discuss the most pressing research needs in the Great Lakes region. Even though the five lakes contain nearly one-fifth of all the world’s Read More …