Art Hasler’s Son Blogs His Dad’s Biography

We here at the Center for Limnology are, of course big fans of Art Hasler. The man not only got the building we call home built in the first place, he also help bring limnology at UW-Madison into modern scientific times.

Art Hasler (with what appears to be a Model T) trailering a boat at Trout Lake, 1934/
Art Hasler (with what appears to be a Model T) trailering a boat at Trout Lake, 1934/

That’s why it was so cool when Fritz, Art’s son, reached out to us and sent a link to a photo biography of his father – starting with a picture of Art as an Eagle Scout in Provo, Utah and ending 77 years later, when Art passed away.
The biography includes pictures of Art and his French horn in the Wisconsin Symphony, Art feeding a dolphin, and Art in Germany right after the conclusion of World War II. It is a treasure trove of cool historic photos and a chronicle of an accomplished scientist and doting dad. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did!
Art Hasler in the Old Lake Lab at the end of Park Street (where Water Science & Engineering is now). Circa 1940.
Art Hasler in the Old Lake Lab at the end of Park Street (where Water Science & Engineering is now). Circa 1940.

Thanks, Fritz, for sending it along! Continue to the bio and  pictures –> 
 

4 thoughts on “Art Hasler’s Son Blogs His Dad’s Biography”

  1. Thanks for this pictoral walk through limnology history. Art has a great legacy both here in Madison and throughout the US.
    I do note the picture of the lotus flowers along the Yahara River. The Friends of Cherokee Marsh over the past couple of years have undertaken the planting of lotus seeds in the Cherokee marsh area of the 4 Lakes watershed, and these plantings have played an important role in caputring sediment both in the Cherokee Lake area and further south along the Yahara into Lake Mendota. A canoe or kayak trip from the north side of Lake Mendota into the Cherokee Marsh area will allow paddlers to view the spectacular lotus beds that should be in blossom in the next few months!

  2. For many years we have heard the following quote attributed to Dr. Hasler. It may have originated in a November 1968 UW magazine publication (possibly entitled “Natural History”). Is there anyway to verify it?
    “The best that can be said for spraying chemical poisons on lakes in the grip of algae and weeds is that it is usually a futile undertaking. Treating a lake with copper sulfate or other toxic chemicals is no more effective than taking aspirin for a brain tumor.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *